XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> How to Enable Google Analytics Site Search for Wordpress

How to Enable Google Analytics Site Search for WordPress

Posted on 26. Mar, 2010 by .

There are a lot of people using Google Analytics for their blogs. It’s a great way to get some insight on your blog. However there are a few things that you should set up in order for Analytics to be more useful.

One of these things is what I am talking about here: enabling site search. If you have site search enabled then this will give you a lot of insight into what kind of content your visitors are searching for and what they are trying to find.

Before we can start you of course need to have a Google Analytics account. If you don’t have an account then sign up for Analytics.

Edit Your Profile – Step 1

After signing in you will see a list of all your accounts. Click on the account for which you want to enable site search. You will now see a page containing different web site profiles, it could also be just one profile. Now click on Edit (as seen in the picture below) within the web site profile.

Website Profiles: Click on Edit within the profile which you want to edit

Edit Your Profile Settings – Step 2

Again you will be lead to a new page. On that new page look to the top right corner. There should be again an Edit button (as seen in the next picture). Click on that button.

Main Website Profile Information: Again, click on Edit (top right corner)

Enable Site Search – Step 3

Now you are going to see a new page which let’s you edit all of the settings. Scroll down to the section Site Search. Within that section click on Do Track Site Search. If you use the standard WordPress search function then enter s as the query parameter.

Site Search: Click on Do Track Site Search and enter the query parameter s if you use the default WordPress search

Save Changes – Step 4

Once you have done that scroll to the bottom and click on Save Changes. Now simply wait for visitors to come and use your site search function and it will show up in Google Analytics.

It’s important to check the site search stats from time to time to see whether people are having trouble finding your information.

Was this article useful? Have you already set up site search for your WordPress blog?

21 Responses to “How to Enable Google Analytics Site Search for WordPress”

  1. Mars Dorian

    26. Mar, 2010

    That’s useful information, but I use WordPress Statistics at the moment, because it’s much more organized and less overwhelming. If you could give 3 solid reasons why I should convert to Analytics, I’m all yours :)

    Reply to this comment
    • jules

      26. Mar, 2010

      I use WordPress statistics too. But I also use Google Analytics. And yes you are right Google Analytics is somewhat overwhelming but once you have gotten to know it, it is such a great tool. For example the thing about internal site search I mentioned here … you can’t do that by using WordPress statistics. Analytics also gives you a lot more information such as if you use Google Adsense you can integrate it within Analytics.
      You can also customize Analytics to show you through which keyword people got to your web site and also on which page of Google this was. I will definitely do some more posts on Analytics, just try it and I will help you to make it a useful tool to you.

      Reply to this comment
      • Patrick Toerner

        01. Apr, 2010

        I use both as well, wordpress stats for daily( or rather minutely) use and google analytics when I really want to check things out.

        Mars, I am sorry to say it, but you gotta get Google Analytics working. It can seem overwhelming because it has so much stuff, but a lot of this stuff is actually very useful.

        Take conversion tracking for example. You can set up Google Analytics to send you an email every time something happens, like every time someone lands on your thank-you page. So you get an email every time a new reader subscribes or whatever you want to track.

        I see wordpress stats as the little sister to google analytics. I use wordpress stats mostly, but if I really want to see whats going on I hop over the the big brother.

        Reply to this comment
        • jules

          05. Apr, 2010

          Thanks for the comment. I will soon visit your blog, I just got back from Scotland. I am glad this post has been useful to you. What would you like to hear more about though? Are there some topics that I should cover?

          Reply to this comment
  2. Jack | Blog Marketing

    29. Mar, 2010

    I actually use both google analytics and wp-stats. WP-stats will give you the total number of page views while GA will give you the number of unique visitors.

    Great post Jules!

    Reply to this comment
    • jules

      05. Apr, 2010

      Thanks Jack. I am glad you like it! Sorry it took me so long to reply but I just got back from Scotland. Won’t travel anymore soon :P

      Reply to this comment
  3. Eric

    31. Mar, 2010

    I did this and I’m not entirely sure what to expect but we’ll see what happens. I don’t check my stats hardly ever though I might keep up on that a bit more now too.

    Reply to this comment
    • jules

      05. Apr, 2010

      I guess I’ll have to write more about this. I soon write a post about how you can use that to get some insightful information. I am glad you have tried it Eric ;) Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply to this comment
  4. Patrick Toerner

    01. Apr, 2010

    By the way, great post. The pictures helped, it took like 20 seconds to do.

    Reply to this comment
  5. Ralph

    05. Apr, 2010

    Julius,
    So far I have been getting whatever stats happen to happen with whatever tools I install. I would like to understand them better and you have given me a start here. I look forward to more of these snippets. I can digest them, implement them and gradually build a better understanding of the tools like Google Analytics.

    Reply to this comment
    • jules

      06. Apr, 2010

      Thanks Ralph. I know what you mean. Sometimes it’s hard to draw some sort of information from these tools but I will write an article about it soon. I hope I can get you to the point where you understand why Analytics is such a better tool.

      Reply to this comment
  6. David Radovanovic

    01. Jul, 2010

    Thanks. I always wondered about setting up “Site Search” and what was the query parameters. Still don’t quite get the different parameter values though. Why “s” ?

    Reply to this comment
    • Julius

      01. Jul, 2010

      Glad to David ;) Well if you use WordPress then your search result page’s URL will look something like this http://andbreak.com/?s=your+search probably with some additional parameters. In this case s is simply the parameter to indicate that a search is taking place. And with Google Analytics you need to tell it when a search is taking place. So that’s why you need to enter s as the search query parameter. I hope this helps ;)

      Reply to this comment
  7. Bjorn van der Neut

    26. Nov, 2010

    Great tutorial but my search url is like this:
    /search/tabletennis/

    How can i
    a) change wordpress so i get s=tabletennis
    b) change analytics so it understands /search/tabletennis

    Reply to this comment
  8. Matt

    09. Dec, 2010

    Those are perma-links via mod-rewrite; you need to tweak the GA javascript to insert the param as part of the page load. Or you can stop using perma-links for search.

    A question on the Site Search. I have it integrated, but what about the ?s as an ignored param in the profile settings? For example, last month I have 3 content views of “blah.com/?s=LadyGaGa” which is a search term of course. So can I put the s both as an ignored param and as the site search param? I’m not sure that’s a good idea, but curious to know if it’ll be ignored in content but still recognized as site search?

    Reply to this comment
    • Julius

      13. Dec, 2010

      To be honest I am not sure either. Why did you ignore the parameter ?s in the first place? If you are not sure whether it will work out then my best advice is to try it out.

      Reply to this comment
  9. Jeremy @ Marketing Web

    12. Apr, 2011

    Ha! I had put s= and that’s why it was not showing up.

    It was so easy :D

    Reply to this comment
  10. Aviva B

    12. Sep, 2011

    I know you wrote this a while ago, but I got to it because I had enabled site search, and nothing had ever shown up. I then tried recently to do my own search (yes, I took off my filter and disabled my Analytics Blocking Add-on so it would catch it), and still nothing showed up. Any ideas about what might be wrong?

    Thanks!

    Reply to this comment
  11. Sean Davis

    04. Oct, 2011

    Thank you! I need this. Following the directions given by Google was easy enough until it asked for the query parameter. I didn’t know what to do.

    Much appreciated!

    Reply to this comment
  12. Thomas Vanhoutte

    13. Jul, 2012

    Been looking for this “s” for a long time now, and now I finally found it.
    Thanks! Because now I can apply this to every one of my WordPress sites to keep track of the searches that are being made on these sites.

    Thanks again! :D

    Reply to this comment

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